Bhitarkanika National Park: Explore the Mangrove Wonder of India

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Introduction to Bhitarkanika

Bhitarkanika is a unique and biodiverse ecosystem located in the Kendrapara district of Odisha, India. It is the second-largest mangrove forest in India, covering an area of over 672 square kilometers.

Bhitarkanika is home to a variety of wildlife, including saltwater crocodiles, Indian pythons, king cobras, flamingos, black ibis, and Irrawaddy dolphins. The park is also a nesting ground for Olive Ridley turtles.

What makes Bhitarkanika special?

Bhitarkanika is special for a number of reasons. First, it is home to a variety of unique and endangered species of wildlife. Second, the park is a vital part of the ecosystem, providing a breeding ground for fish and other marine life. Third, Bhitarkanika is a beautiful and scenic place to visit, with its mangrove forests, mudflats, and rivers.

Here are some specific features that make Bhitarkanika special:

  • The largest saltwater crocodile population in India: Bhitarkanika is home to the largest saltwater crocodile population in India, with an estimated 2,000 crocodiles living in the park.
  • A nesting ground for Olive Ridley turtles: Bhitarkanika is one of the most important nesting grounds for Olive Ridley turtles in the world. Every year, millions of Olive Ridley turtles come to Bhitarkanika to lay their eggs.
  • A diverse range of mangrove species: Bhitarkanika is home to a diverse range of mangrove species, including the Sundari, Gewa, and Avicennia species. These mangroves provide a vital habitat for a variety of wildlife, including fish, crabs, and birds.
  • A scenic beauty: Bhitarkanika is a beautiful and scenic place to visit, with its mangrove forests, mudflats, and rivers. Visitors can enjoy boat safaris, nature walks, and birdwatching in the park.

Bhitarkanika is a truly special place, and it is worth visiting for its unique ecosystem, wildlife, and scenic beauty.

Flora and fauna of Bhitarkanika

Mammals of Bhitarkanika

Here are the four mammals you mentioned with images to enhance the content:

saltwater crocodile

The saltwater crocodile is the largest crocodile species in the world and is considered to be one of the most dangerous predators. It is found in the mangrove forests, mudflats, and rivers of Bhitarkanika National Park. Saltwater crocodiles can grow up to 23 feet long and weigh up to 2,200 pounds. They are carnivores and their diet consists of fish, crustaceans, birds, mammals, and reptiles.

Saltwater crocodiles are ambush predators. They wait patiently in the water, hidden from view, until their prey comes close enough. Then, they strike with lightning speed, grabbing their prey with their powerful jaws and dragging it into the water to drown.

Saltwater crocodiles are important members of the Bhitarkanika National Park ecosystem. They help to control populations of other animals, such as fish and mammals. Saltwater crocodiles are also a popular tourist attraction, and visitors to the park can enjoy boat safaris to see these amazing creatures up close.

Here are some additional facts about saltwater crocodiles:

  • Saltwater crocodiles are the only crocodile species that can live in saltwater.
  • Saltwater crocodiles have a lifespan of up to 70 years.
  • Saltwater crocodiles are apex predators, meaning that they have no natural predators.
  • Saltwater crocodiles are a threatened species due to habitat loss and hunting.

Saltwater crocodiles are truly fascinating creatures. They are powerful and intelligent predators that play an important role in the Bhitarkanika National Park ecosystem.

Indian Blackbuck

The Indian blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra) is a small antelope that is found in grasslands and open woodlands throughout India. It is known for its black fur and spiral horns. The Indian blackbuck is an important herbivore in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem and helps to control the growth of vegetation.

The Indian blackbuck is a medium-sized antelope, with a shoulder height of 74 to 84 cm (29 to 33 in) and a weight of 20 to 57 kg (44 to 126 lb). Males are larger than females and have black fur, while females are fawn-colored. Both males and females have white underparts and a white patch on the rump. Males have spiral horns that can grow up to 75 cm (30 in) long.

Indian blackbucks are social animals and live in herds of up to 50 individuals. The herds are typically led by a dominant male. Indian blackbucks are herbivores and their diet consists of grasses, leaves, and fruits. They are also known to eat insects and small animals.

Indian blackbucks are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the growth of vegetation and provide food for other predators. Indian blackbucks are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Indian blackbucks are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to Indian blackbucks are habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

Spotted deer

The spotted deer (Axis axis) is a medium-sized deer that is found in forests and grasslands throughout India. It is known for its spotted coat and antlers. The spotted deer is an important herbivore in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem and helps to control the growth of vegetation.

The spotted deer has a shoulder height of 60 to 90 cm (24 to 35 in) and a weight of 30 to 40 kg (66 to 88 lb). Males are larger than females and have antlers that can grow up to 70 cm (28 in) long. The spotted deer’s coat is covered in white spots on a reddish-brown background. The underparts and legs are white.

Spotted deer are social animals and live in herds of up to 50 individuals. The herds are typically led by a dominant male. Spotted deer are herbivores and their diet consists of grasses, leaves, and fruits. They are also known to eat insects and small animals.

Spotted deer are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the growth of vegetation and provide food for other predators. Spotted deer are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Spotted deer are listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. However, they are vulnerable to habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

Fishing Cat

The fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is a small wild cat that is found in coastal regions throughout Asia. It is known for its love of fish and its ability to swim.

The fishing cat has a slender body with long legs and webbed paws. Its fur is reddish-brown with black stripes on the back and sides. The underparts are white. The fishing cat has a long tail, which it uses for balance when swimming.

Fishing cats are solitary animals and live in wetlands such as mangrove forests, swamps, and marshes. They are nocturnal hunters and their diet consists mainly of fish, but they also eat other aquatic animals, such as frogs, crabs, and shrimp. Fishing cats are also known to eat small mammals, birds, and reptiles.

Fishing cats are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of fish and other aquatic animals. Fishing cats are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Fishing cats are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to fishing cats are habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

Fishing cats are fascinating animals and play an important role in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. It is important to protect these cats so that they can continue to thrive.

Birds:

Flamingos:

Flamingos are large wading birds in the genus Phoenicopterus. They are found in both the Old World and the New World. Flamingos are known for their long, curved beaks and their bright pink or red plumage.

Flamingos are filter feeders and their diet consists mainly of algae and small invertebrates. They filter the food from the water by wading through it and swinging their heads from side to side. Flamingos are also known to eat small fish and crustaceans.

Flamingos are social animals and live in large colonies. The colonies can number several thousand individuals. Flamingos breed in the spring and summer. The females lay one or two eggs in a nest made of mud and twigs. The eggs are incubated by both the male and female for about 28 days.

Flamingos are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of algae and other aquatic organisms. Flamingos are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Flamingos are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to flamingos are habitat loss, hunting, and climate change.

Black ibis

The black ibis (Pseudibis papillosa) is a large wading bird that is found in wetlands throughout Asia. It is known for its black plumage and its long, curved beak.

The black ibis has a wingspan of up to 1.8 meters (5.9 feet) and a body length of up to 75 centimeters (30 inches). It has black plumage with a white patch on the forehead and a red eye. The black ibis’s beak is long and curved, and it is used to filter food from the water.

Black ibises are social animals and live in flocks of up to 100 individuals. They are found in a variety of wetlands, including mangrove forests, swamps, and marshes. Black ibises are opportunistic feeders and their diet consists of a variety of aquatic animals, including fish, insects, and crustaceans.

Black ibises are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of aquatic animals and provide food for other predators. Black ibises are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Black ibises are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to black ibises are habitat loss, hunting, and pollution.

white-bellied sea eagle

The white-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) is a large bird of prey that is found in coastal regions throughout Asia. It is known for its white belly and its powerful beak and talons.

The white-bellied sea eagle has a wingspan of up to 2.4 meters (7.9 feet) and a body length of up to 1 meter (3.3 feet). It has a dark brown back and wings, and a white belly and chest. The head and neck are white with a dark brown stripe through the eye. The beak is yellow and the talons are black.

White-bellied sea eagles are solitary birds and live in coastal areas, such as mangrove forests, estuaries, and rivers. They are opportunistic feeders and their diet consists mainly of fish, but they also eat other aquatic animals, such as crabs, turtles, and snakes. White-bellied sea eagles are also known to eat small mammals and birds.

White-bellied sea eagles are an important part of the coastal ecosystem. They help to control the populations of fish and other aquatic animals. White-bellied sea eagles are also a popular tourist attraction in many coastal areas.

White-bellied sea eagles are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to white-bellied sea eagles are habitat loss, hunting, and pollution.

White-bellied sea eagles are amazing creatures and play an important role in the coastal ecosystem. It is important to protect these birds so that they can continue to thrive.

osprey

The osprey (Pandion haliaetus) is a medium-sized bird of prey that is found in wetlands and coastal areas throughout the world. It is known for its distinctive brown and white plumage, its long, narrow wings, and its hooked beak.

Ospreys are fish-eating birds and their diet consists mainly of fish. They are skilled fishermen and use their sharp talons to catch fish in mid-air. Ospreys typically nest in tall trees near water and they lay two to four eggs per clutch. The eggs are incubated by both the male and female for about 35 days.

Ospreys are an important part of the wetland ecosystem. They help to control the populations of fish and provide food for other predators. Ospreys are also a popular tourist attraction in many wetland areas.

Ospreys are listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. However, they are vulnerable to habitat loss, pollution, and overfishing.

Ospreys are amazing birds and play an important role in the wetland ecosystem. It is important to protect these birds so that they can continue to thrive.

Reptiles: Indian python, king cobra, monitor lizard

Indian python

The Indian python (Python molurus) is a non-venomous snake that is found in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal. It is the largest snake in India and can grow up to 6 meters (20 feet) long.

The Indian python has a thick, muscular body with a brown or olive green ground color and irregular yellow or white markings. The underparts are white or light yellow. The Indian python has a large head with a rounded snout and small eyes.

Indian pythons are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and wetlands. They are ambush predators and prey on a variety of animals, including mammals, birds, and reptiles. Indian pythons are also known to eat eggs.

Indian pythons are an important part of the ecosystem and help to control the populations of prey animals. Indian pythons are also a popular tourist attraction in many areas.

Indian pythons are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to Indian pythons are habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

Indian pythons are fascinating creatures and play an important role in the ecosystem. It is important to protect these snakes so that they can continue to thrive.

King cobra

The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake in the world and is found in Southeast Asia. It is also found in Bhitarkanika National Park, India.

King cobras are known for their distinctive hood, which they can expand to make themselves look larger and more intimidating. They are also known for their loud hissing sound, which they use to warn off predators.

King cobras are apex predators and their diet consists mainly of other snakes, including other cobras. They are also known to eat lizards, frogs, and small mammals.

King cobras are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of other snakes and prey animals. King cobras are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

King cobras are listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The main threats to king cobras are habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

King cobras are fascinating creatures and play an important role in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. It is important to protect these snakes so that they can continue to thrive.

Monitor Lizard

The monitor lizard (Varanus salvator) is a large, semi-aquatic lizard that is found in Southeast Asia and India. It is the largest lizard in India and can grow up to 3 meters (10 feet) long.

Monitor lizards have a long, slender body with a long tail. Their skin is covered in scales and their color can vary from brown to green to black. Monitor lizards have a powerful jaw and sharp teeth.

Monitor lizards are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and wetlands. They are also found in coastal areas and mangrove forests. Monitor lizards are ambush predators and prey on a variety of animals, including fish, frogs, snakes, birds, and mammals. Monitor lizards are also known to eat eggs.

Monitor lizards are an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of prey animals and they also scavengers, helping to clean up the environment. Monitor lizards are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Monitor lizards are listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. However, they are vulnerable to habitat loss, hunting, and poaching.

Monitor lizards are fascinating creatures and play an important role in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. It is important to protect these lizards so that they can continue to thrive.

Amphibians and fish: Indian bullfrog, mudskipper, Irrawaddy dolphin

Indian Bullfrog:

Hoplobatrachus tigerinus is a large species of frog native to South Asia. It is the largest frog found in India and can grow up to 25 cm (9.8 in) in length. The Indian bullfrog is a carnivorous frog and its diet consists mainly of insects, but it also eats other frogs, small reptiles, and mammals. The Indian bullfrog is an important part of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem and plays a role in controlling the populations of prey animals.

Indian bullfrogs are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and wetlands. They are also found in coastal areas and mangrove forests. Indian bullfrogs are nocturnal animals and they spend the day hiding in burrows or under logs. At night, they come out to hunt for food. Indian bullfrogs are ambush predators and they catch their prey by waiting for it to come close enough to be pounced upon.

Indian bullfrogs are important members of the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of prey animals and they also provide food for other predators, such as snakes and birds. Indian bullfrogs are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Mudskipper

Periophthalmus mudskipper is a small fish that is found in mudflats and mangrove forests throughout the tropics. Mudskippers are known for their ability to breathe air and walk on land. This is due to a special organ called the suprabranchial chamber, which allows them to absorb oxygen from the air. Mudskippers can also store water in their gills and mouth, which allows them to stay hydrated on land.

Mudskippers are carnivorous fish and their diet consists mainly of insects, but they also eat other small animals, such as crabs and shrimp. Mudskippers are ambush predators and they catch their prey by waiting for it to come close enough to be pounced upon.

Mudskippers play an important role in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of prey animals and they also provide food for other predators, such as snakes and birds. Mudskippers are also a popular tourist attraction in Bhitarkanika.

Adaptations to life on land

Mudskippers have a number of adaptations that allow them to live on land. These adaptations include:

  • Suprabranchial chamber: This organ allows mudskippers to breathe air.
  • Thick skin: Mudskippers have thick skin that helps to protect them from the sun and from drying out.
  • Strong muscles: Mudskippers have strong muscles in their fins that allow them to prop themselves up and walk on land.
  • Eyes on top of their head: Mudskippers have eyes on top of their head, which gives them a good view of their surroundings when they are on land.

Threats to mudskippers

Mudskippers are facing a number of threats, including:

  • Habitat loss: Mudskippers rely on mangrove forests for their survival. However, mangrove forests are being cleared at an alarming rate to make way for development.
  • Pollution: Mudskippers are also threatened by pollution from agricultural runoff and industrial waste.
  • Overfishing: Mudskippers are sometimes overfished for food or for use as bait.

It is important to protect mudskippers and their habitat. We can do this by supporting sustainable fishing practices and by protecting mangrove forests.

Irrawaddy dolphin

The Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) is a small, freshwater dolphin that is found in coastal waters and estuaries throughout Asia. It is a highly endangered species, with a population of less than 7,500 individuals worldwide.

Irrawaddy dolphins are known for their distinctive bulbous forehead and their short beak. They are also known for their ability to breathe air through their blowhole at the top of their head.

Irrawaddy dolphins are found in a variety of habitats, including mangrove forests, mudflats, and rivers. They are social animals and live in groups of up to 12 individuals.

Irrawaddy dolphins are carnivores and their diet consists mainly of fish and squid. They are also known to eat crabs and shrimp.

Irrawaddy dolphins play an important role in the Bhitarkanika ecosystem. They help to control the populations of prey animals and they also provide food for other predators, such as crocodiles and sharks.

Irrawaddy dolphins are facing a number of threats, including:

  • Habitat loss: Irrawaddy dolphins rely on mangrove forests and estuaries for their survival. However, these habitats are being degraded and destroyed at an alarming rate due to development and pollution.
  • Overfishing: Irrawaddy dolphins are sometimes caught in fishing nets.
  • Pollution: Irrawaddy dolphins are also threatened by pollution from agricultural runoff and industrial waste.

It is important to protect Irrawaddy dolphins and their habitat. We can do this by supporting sustainable development practices and by reducing pollution.

Irrawaddy dolphins in Bhitarkanika

Bhitarkanika National Park is one of the few places in India where Irrawaddy dolphins can be found. The park is home to a population of around 55 dolphins.

The dolphins in Bhitarkanika are relatively well-protected. The park is closed to commercial fishing and there are a number of conservation measures in place to protect the dolphins.

However, the dolphins in Bhitarkanika are still facing a number of threats, including habitat loss and pollution. It is important to continue to work to protect these dolphins and their habitat.

Things to do in Bhitarkanika

Boat safari: 

One of the best things to do in Bhitarkanika is to take a boat safari. Boat safaris are available from a number of different operators in Bhitarkanika. The safaris typically last for around 2-3 hours and will take you through the mangrove forests, which are home to a variety of wildlife.

On a boat safari, you are likely to see crocodiles, dolphins, deer, water birds, and other animals. You may also be able to see the rare Olive Ridley sea turtles, which come to Bhitarkanika to nest each year.

Boat safaris are a great way to experience the beauty of Bhitarkanika and to see some of the amazing wildlife that the park has to offer.

Here are some tips for taking a boat safari in Bhitarkanika:

  • Book your safari in advance, especially if you are visiting during the peak season.
  • Bring sunscreen, insect repellent, and water.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and clothing.
  • Be respectful of the wildlife and do not litter.

Other things to do in Bhitarkanika

In addition to boat safaris, there are a number of other things to do in Bhitarkanika, including:

  • Visit the Gahirmatha Marine Sanctuary: The Gahirmatha Marine Sanctuary is a protected area that is home to the world’s largest nesting colony of Olive Ridley sea turtles. Visitors can take boat tours to the sanctuary and see the turtles nesting.
  • Visit the Bhitarkanika National Park Interpretation Centre: The Bhitarkanika National Park Interpretation Centre is a great place to learn about the park’s wildlife and ecology. The centre has a variety of exhibits and a film theatre.
  • Visit the Bhitarkanika Turtle Research Centre: The Bhitarkanika Turtle Research Centre is a research and conservation centre for sea turtles. Visitors can learn about the centre’s work and see the turtles up close.

Getting to Bhitarkanika

Bhitarkanika is located in the Kendrapara district of Odisha, India. The nearest airport is Bhubaneswar Airport, which is about 200 km (124 mi) from Bhitarkanika. The nearest railway station is Kendrapara Railway Station, which is about 60 km (37 mi) from Bhitarkanika.

There are a number of buses and taxis that operate between Bhubaneswar and Kendrapara. From Kendrapara, you can take a taxi or a bus to Bhitarkanika.

Nature walk:

Another great way to experience the natural beauty of Bhitarkanika is to take a nature walk. Nature walks are typically led by knowledgeable guides who can teach you about the local flora and fauna.

On a nature walk, you are likely to see a variety of plants and animals, including:

  • Plants: Mangroves, sundari trees, and a variety of other plants
  • Animals: Birds, snakes, lizards, insects, and other animals

Nature walks are a great way to learn about the Bhitarkanika ecosystem and to see some of the amazing wildlife that the park has to offer.

Tips for taking a nature walk in Bhitarkanika

  • Wear comfortable shoes and clothing.
  • Bring sunscreen, insect repellent, and water.
  • Be respectful of the wildlife and do not litter.
  • Follow the instructions of your guide.

Here are some of the best places to take a nature walk in Bhitarkanika:

  • Bhitarkanika National Park: The Bhitarkanika National Park is a great place to take a nature walk and see a variety of wildlife. The park has a number of trails that you can follow, including the crocodile trail, the bird trail, and the mangrove trail.
  • Gahirmatha Marine Sanctuary: The Gahirmatha Marine Sanctuary is another great place to take a nature walk. The sanctuary has a number of trails that you can follow, including the turtle trail and the marine life trail.
  • Bhitarkanika Turtle Research Centre: The Bhitarkanika Turtle Research Centre has a nature trail that takes you through the mangrove forest. The trail is a great place to see a variety of plants and animals, including sea turtles.

Getting to Bhitarkanika

Bhitarkanika is located in the Kendrapara district of Odisha, India. The nearest airport is Bhubaneswar Airport, which is about 200 km (124 mi) from Bhitarkanika. The nearest railway station is Kendrapara Railway Station, which is about 60 km (37 mi) from Bhitarkanika.

There are a number of buses and taxis that operate between Bhubaneswar and Kendrapara. From Kendrapara, you can take a taxi or a bus to Bhitarkanika.

Birdwatching in Bhitarkanika National Park

Bhitarkanika National Park is a birdwatcher’s paradise, with over 260 species of birds found within its boundaries. The park’s diverse habitats, including mangrove forests, mudflats, and rivers, provide food and shelter for a wide variety of birdlife.

Some of the most popular birds to spot in Bhitarkanika include:

  • Flamingos: Bhitarkanika is home to one of the largest breeding colonies of flamingos in India. These elegant birds can be seen congregating in large flocks in the park’s shallow waters.
  • Kingfishers: Bhitarkanika is home to eight different species of kingfishers, including the black-capped kingfisher, the brown-winged kingfisher, and the white-throated kingfisher. These colorful birds are known for their dazzling plumage and their incredible fishing skills.
  • Herons and egrets: Bhitarkanika is a haven for herons and egrets, with over 20 different species found in the park. These graceful birds are often seen wading in the shallow waters or perched on the branches of mangrove trees.
  • Migratory birds: Bhitarkanika is a popular wintering ground for migratory birds from all over the world. Some of the migratory birds that can be spotted in the park include the bar-headed goose, the northern pintail, and the common teal.

The best time for birdwatching in Bhitarkanika is during the winter months (October to February), when the migratory birds are present. However, birdwatching can be enjoyed year-round in the park.

Here are some tips for birdwatching in Bhitarkanika National Park:

  • Use binoculars or a spotting scope. This will help you to get a closer look at the birds without disturbing them.
  • Be patient and quiet. Birds are easily spooked, so it is important to be patient and quiet when birdwatching.
  • Dress in camouflage clothing. This will help you to blend in with your surroundings and make it less likely to disturb the birds.
  • Be respectful of the birds and their habitat. Do not litter or damage the environment.

If you are a birdwatcher, then Bhitarkanika National Park is a must-visit destination. With its diverse habitats and abundant birdlife, the park has something to offer birdwatchers of all levels of experience.

List of Birds

Bhitarkanika National Park: Birds Species name

  1. Indian peafowl
  2. White-throated kingfisher
  3. Common kingfisher
  4. Black-capped kingfisher
  5. Brown-winged kingfisher
  6. Green-billed malkoha
  7. Brown-headed barbet
  8. Coppersmith barbet
  9. Lineated barbet
  10. Greater coucal
  11. Lesser coucal
  12. Indian cuckoo
  13. Plain prinia
  14. Ashy prinia
  15. Tailorbird
  16. Common Tailorbird
  17. Long-tailed shrike
  18. Common shrike
  19. Grey shrike
  20. Black drongo
  21. Ashy drongo
  22. White-bellied drongo
  23. Lesser racket-tailed drongo
  24. Greater racket-tailed drongo
  25. Common woodshrike
  26. Large cuckoo-shrike
  27. Small cuckoo-shrike
  28. Oriental magpie-robin
  29. Indian robin
  30. Magpie-robin
  31. Blue-breasted flycatcher
  32. Indian paradise flycatcher
  33. Asian paradise flycatcher
  34. Verditer flycatcher
  35. Ultramarine flycatcher
  36. Chestnut-winged babbler
  37. Indian babbler
  38. Jungle babbler
  39. Yellow-eyed babbler
  40. White-browed bulbul
  41. Red-whiskered bulbul
  42. Yellow-vented bulbul
  43. Black-headed munia
  44. Spotted munia
  45. Scaly-breasted munia
  46. White-throated munia
  47. Black-faced laughingthrush
  48. Common myna
  49. Indian myna
  50. Brahminy starling
  51. House crow
  52. Jungle crow
  53. Common green pigeon
  54. Ashy wood pigeon
  55. Imperial pigeon
  56. Emerald dove
  57. Spotted dove
  58. Common peafowl
  59. Grey hornbill
  60. Indian hornbill
  61. Malabar trogon
  62. Indian pitta
  63. Indian kingfisher
  64. Spotted owlet
  65. Indian scops owlet
  66. Brown fish-owl
  67. Indian eagle-owl
  68. Spotted eagle-owl
  69. Common kestrel
  70. Lesser kestrel
  71. Oriental hobby
  72. Shikra
  73. Crested serpent eagle
  74. Changeable hawk-eagle
  75. Indian spotted eagle
  76. Greater spotted eagle
  77. Lesser spotted eagle
  78. Pallas’s fishing eagle
  79. Grey-headed fish eagle
  80. White-bellied sea eagle
  81. Osprey
  82. Himalayan griffon
  83. Eurasian vulture
  84. Indian vulture
  85. Egyptian vulture
  86. Red-headed vulture
  87. White-backed vulture
  88. Cinereous vulture
  89. Indian peafowl
  90. Greater painted-snipe
  91. Common greenshank
  92. Marsh sandpiper
  93. Common sandpiper
  94. Wood sandpiper
  95. Terek sandpiper
  96. Curlew sandpiper
  97. Dunlin
  98. Ruff
  99. Black-tailed godwit
  100. Bar-tailed godwit
  101. Eurasian wigeon
  102. Northern pintail
  103. Garganey
  104. Common teal
  105. Mallard
  106. Northern shoveler
  107. Gadwall
  108. Common pochard
  109. Ferruginous pochard
  110. Tufted duck
  111. Greater scaup
  112. Common snipe
  113. Pin-tailed snipe
  114. Red-necked phalarope
  115. Grey heron
  116. Purple heron
  117. Great egret
  118. Intermediate egret
  119. Little egret
  120. Cattle egret
  121. Black-crowned night heron
  122. Indian pond heron
  123. Little green heron
  124. Common flamingo
  125. Painted stork
  126. Asian openbill stork
  127. Glossy ibis
  128. Black ibis
  129. Spoon
  130. Little cormorant
  131. Indian cormorant
  132. Great cormorant
  133. Darter
  134. Little tern
  135. Gull-billed tern
  136. Common tern
  137. Whiskered tern
  138. River tern
  139. Black-bellied tern
  140. Lesser crested tern
  141. Caspian tern
  142. Great thick-knee
  143. Indian thick-knee
  144. Painted sandgrouse
  145. Black-bellied sandgrouse
  146. Common coot
  147. Red-knobbed coot
  148. Pheasant-tailed jacana
  149. Bronze-winged jacana
  150. Northern jacana
  151. Lesser florican
  152. Indian grey hornbill
  153. Rufous-bellied woodpecker
  154. Indian roller
  155. Common hoopoe
  156. Indian green bee-eater
  157. Blue-tailed bee-eater
  158. Chestnut-headed bee-eater
  159. Dollarbird
  160. Asian koel
  161. Indian koel
  162. Common emerald dove
  163. Spotted dove
  164. Eurasian collared dove
  165. Alexandrine parakeet
  166. Plum-headed parakeet
  167. Rose-ringed parakeet
  168. Indian lorikeet
  169. Asian barred owlet
  170. Spotted owlet
  171. Mottled wood owl
  172. Brown fish owl
  173. Indian eagle owl
  174. Spotted eagle owl
  175. Jungle owlet
  176. Oriental scops owl
  177. Eurasian scops owl
  178. Indian nightjar
  179. Grey nightjar
  180. Large-tailed nightjar
  181. Pied kingfisher
  182. Common kingfisher
  183. White-throated kingfisher
  184. Black-capped kingfisher
  185. Brown-winged kingfisher
  186. Green-billed malkoha
  187. Common hawk-cuckoo
  188. Plain prinia
  189. Ashy prinia
  190. Tailorbird
  191. Common tailorbird
  192. Long-tailed shrike
  193. Common shrike
  194. Grey shrike
  195. Black drongo
  196. Ashy drongo
  197. White-bellied drongo
  198. Lesser racket-tailed drongo
  199. Greater racket-tailed drongo
  200. Common woodshrike
  201. Large cuckoo-shrike
  202. Small cuckoo-shrike
  203. Oriental magpie-robin
  204. Indian robin
  205. Magpie-robin
  206. Blue-breasted flycatcher
  207. Indian paradise flycatcher
  208. Asian paradise flycatcher
  209. Verditer flycatcher
  210. Ultramarine flycatcher
  211. Chestnut-winged babbler
  212. Indian babbler
  213. Jungle babbler
  214. Yellow-eyed babbler
  215. White-browed bulbul
  216. Red-whiskered bulbul
  217. Yellow-vented bulbul
  218. Black-headed munia
  219. Spotted munia
  220. Scaly-breasted munia
  221. White-throated munia
  222. Black-faced laughingthrush
  223. Common myna
  224. Indian myna
  225. Brahminy starling
  226. House crow
  227. Jungle crow
  228. Common green pigeon
  229. Ashy wood pigeon
  230. Imperial pigeon
  231. Emerald dove
  232. Spotted dove
  233. Common peafowl
  234. Grey hornbill
  235. Indian hornbill
  236. Malabar trogon
  237. Indian pitta
  238. Indian kingfisher
  239. Spotted owlet
  240. Indian scops owlet

Visit a local village: 

Visiting a local village near Bhitarkanika National Park is a great way to learn about the local culture and way of life. The villages around Bhitarkanika are home to a number of different indigenous communities, including the Odia, the Mundari, and the Santhal. These communities have a rich culture and heritage that is deeply connected to the natural world.

Here are a few things you can do when visiting a local village near Bhitarkanika National Park:

  • Visit a traditional village home: Many of the villages around Bhitarkanika still have traditional houses that are made of mud and bamboo. These houses are often decorated with intricate designs and are a great example of traditional Odia architecture.
  • Meet the locals: The people of Bhitarkanika are known for their hospitality. They are always happy to meet visitors and share their culture and way of life. You can learn about their traditional dress, food, music, and dance.
  • Learn about the local economy: The village economy in Bhitarkanika is largely based on agriculture and fishing. You can visit the local market to see what produce is being sold and to learn about the different ways that the villagers make a living.
  • Visit a local temple: There are a number of temples in the villages around Bhitarkanika. These temples are important places of worship for the local people and offer a glimpse into the religious beliefs and practices of the region.

Here are a few specific villages that you can visit near Bhitarkanika National Park:

  • Khola: Khola is a small village that is located on the banks of the Brahmani River. The village is home to a number of traditional houses and temples. It is also a good place to see the local fishermen at work.
  • Gupti: Gupti is another small village that is located near Bhitarkanika National Park. The village is known for its beautiful landscape and its traditional culture.
  • Balikuda: Balikuda is a larger village that is located about 20 kilometers from Bhitarkanika National Park. The village is home to a number of markets, temples, and schools. It is a good place to learn about the local economy and way of life.

If you are interested in visiting a local village near Bhitarkanika National Park, I recommend that you contact the Bhitarkanika Forest Department. They can provide you with more information about the villages in the area and can help you to arrange a visit.

Sustainable tourism in Bhitarkanika

Bhitarkanika Eco Cottage:

Bhitarkanika Eco Cottage is an eco-friendly cottage that is located in the heart of Bhitarkanika National Park in Odisha, India. The cottage is made of bamboo and other natural materials and is powered by solar energy. It offers a sustainable way to experience the park’s beauty and learn about its unique ecosystem.

The cottage has a number of features that make it eco-friendly, including:

  • Solar panels that generate electricity for the cottage
  • A rainwater harvesting system that collects rainwater for drinking and irrigation
  • A composting system that converts food waste into compost, which is then used to fertilize the garden
  • A greywater recycling system that treats wastewater for reuse in irrigation

The cottage is also located in a beautiful setting, surrounded by mangrove forests and rivers. It offers a number of activities for guests to enjoy, including:

  • Boat safaris to see the park’s wildlife, including crocodiles, dolphins, and deer
  • Nature walks through the mangrove forests
  • Birdwatching
  • Fishing
  • Cultural performances

Bhitarkanika Eco Cottage is a great option for travelers who are looking for a sustainable and authentic way to experience Bhitarkanika National Park. The cottage offers comfortable accommodations, delicious food, and a variety of activities to enjoy. It is also a great way to support the local community and help to protect the park’s ecosystem.

Community-based tourism: 

Community-based tourism (CBT) is a type of tourism that is designed to benefit the local community. CBT initiatives in Bhitarkanika provide visitors with an authentic experience of the local culture and way of life, while also generating income for the local people.

Here are a few examples of community-based tourism initiatives in Bhitarkanika:

  • Village homestays: Visitors can stay in traditional village homes and experience the local way of life. Homestays are typically run by local families who provide their guests with meals, accommodation, and activities such as nature walks and boat safaris.
  • Cultural performances: Visitors can watch traditional Odia cultural performances, such as dance, music, and drama. These performances are often put on by local villagers and provide a glimpse into the region’s rich culture and heritage.
  • Crafts workshops: Visitors can learn about traditional Odia crafts, such as weaving, pottery, and basket making. These workshops are often run by local artisans who teach visitors the skills they need to create their own crafts.
  • Eco-tourism activities: Visitors can participate in eco-tourism activities, such as boat safaris, nature walks, and birdwatching. These activities are often run by local tour operators who provide their guests with information about the park’s ecosystem and wildlife.

Community-based tourism initiatives in Bhitarkanika offer a number of benefits for both visitors and the local community. For visitors, CBT provides an authentic experience of the local culture and way of life. For the local community, CBT provides income and helps to preserve traditional culture and heritage.

Here are a few tips for choosing a community-based tourism initiative in Bhitarkanika:

  • Look for initiatives that are run by local communities. This will ensure that the benefits of tourism are shared directly with the local people.
  • Ask about the initiative’s commitment to sustainability. Make sure that the initiative is using sustainable practices and that it is helping to protect the park’s ecosystem.
  • Read reviews from other travelers. This will give you an idea of what other people have experienced and whether the initiative is a good fit for you.

Conclusion

Why visit Bhitarkanika?

Bhitarkanika National Park is a beautiful and unique ecosystem that is home to a variety of wildlife, including crocodiles, dolphins, deer, and birds. The park is also home to a number of indigenous communities who have a rich culture and heritage.

Here are a few reasons why you should visit Bhitarkanika:

  • To see the park’s wildlife: Bhitarkanika is home to a variety of wildlife, including crocodiles, dolphins, deer, and birds. The park’s mangrove